Monday, 12 October 2020

#5OnMyTBR | Historical

So, I needed something to post on monday for when I don't have any reviews to put up and I came across this series that highlights 5 books on your TBR that fit a specific prompt and I really liked the idea so I thought I'd give it a go. I don't know if I'll be participating every week but I'll probably do it when I find a prompt interesting and I have books that fit. This meme was created by E. @ Local Bee Hunter's Nook and you can find the announcement post here. Also, side note, these aren't necessarily books that I own physically but they're all on my Goodreads TBR and they'll mostly be the five most recently added. 

This Week's Prompt is...

Historical. I have quite a few historical books on my TBR so I tried to choose 5 set in different decades or eras to mix it up a bit.
 
 
The other orphans say Margot is lucky. Lucky to survive the horrible accident that killed her family. Lucky to have her own room because she wakes up screaming every night.

And finally, lucky to be chosen by a prestigious family to live at their remote country estate.

But it wasn't luck that made the Suttons rescue Margot from her bleak existence at the group home. Margot was hand-picked to be a companion to their silent, mysterious daughter, Agatha. At first, helping with Agatha - and getting to know her handsome older brother - seems much better than the group home. But soon, the isolated, gothic house begins playing tricks on Margot’s mind, making her question everything she believes about the Suttons... and herself.

Margot’s bad dreams may have stopped when she came to live with Agatha – but the real nightmare has just begun.
   
 
This sounds like a super creepy gothic thriller and it's one I only discovered recently but it's very high on my want to read list.
 

2. Forget This Ever Happened by Cassandra Rose Clarke

 

Sometimes there's a town called Indianola.

And sometimes there isn't.

Summer, 1993. Claire has been dumped in rural Indianola, Texas, to spend her whole vacation taking care of mean, sickly Grammy. There's nothing too remarkable about Indianola: it's run-down, shabby, and stifling hot, a pin-dot on the Gulf Coast.

Well, there is one remarkable thing, she discovers. Something otherworldly.

But if you leave Indianola, you forget about it... and if you stay, you have to live with it every day.

Because there's a confluence of energies at Indianola, a fissure in time and space, a gap in reality. Nothing is as it seems. And unless Claire can figure out this town--the talkative lizards under the pecan trees; the honey-sweet but terrifying girl next door; the cute daughter of a powerful family, who would answer Claire's questions if she had any answers; the pervasive sense of history coming unspooled, like a video tape--she might never leave.
 

I haven't read too many books set in the 90's but it's an era I'm really interested in (I only lived through the last four years of it!) and this sounds incredibly interesting. 

3. Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff

 

Chicago, 1954. When his father Montrose goes missing, twenty-two year old Army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George, publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide, and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the manor of Mr. Braithwhite, heir to the estate that owned Atticus’s great grandmother, they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours.

At the manor, Atticus discovers his father in chains, held prisoner by a secret cabal named the Order of the Ancient Dawn, led by Samuel Braithwhite and his son Caleb, which has gathered to orchestrate a ritual that shockingly centers on Atticus. And his one hope of salvation may be the seed of his, and the whole Turner clan’s destruction.

I know that a tv series based on this book has just been released and I'm interested in watching it but want to read the book first of course!

4. Little Witches: Magic in Concord by Leigh Dragoon

Jo, Beth, Amy, and Meg March are four sisters living in Concord with their parents—Father, who's tending to soldiers fighting in the Civil War, and Marmee, who teaches the girls simple but effective witchcraft. The Marches have to keep their craft quiet, as there are many in Concord who see magic in a bad light—especially after things have begun disappearing. When Mr. Laurence, a witchfinder, moves in next door to investigate the missing objects, the girls fear for their livelihood. But he turns out to be a kind old man, and his grandson, Laurie, quickly befriends the Marches. As the cold winter blusters on, the girls continue their education, even as missing objects soon turn into missing people. Things take a turn for the worse when Jo and Laurie try investigating on their own, and a dangerous storm takes hold of Concord. There's powerful magic at play here—stronger than anything the Marches, or even Laurie, has ever seen before. Can they hope to defeat it? Or has the magic already become too strong for them to fight against?

This is a graphic novel based on the book Little Women by Louisa May Alcott and it sounds adorable and there's magic mixed in! I'm not overly keen on the art style, if we're going by the front cover, but I still would very much like to read it at some point.
 

5. The Wrong Kind of Woman by Sarah McCraw Crow 

   

In late 1970, Oliver Desmarais drops dead in his front yard while hanging Christmas lights. In the year that follows, his widow, Virginia, struggles to find her place on the campus of the elite New Hampshire men’s college where Oliver was a professor. While Virginia had always shared her husband’s prejudices against the four outspoken, never-married women on the faculty—dubbed the Gang of Four by their male counterparts—she now finds herself depending on them, even joining their work to bring the women’s movement to Clarendon College.

Soon, though, reports of violent protests across the country reach this sleepy New England town, stirring tensions between the fraternal establishment of Clarendon and those calling for change. As authorities attempt to tamp down “radical elements,” Virginia must decide whether she’s willing to put herself and her family at risk for a cause that had never felt like her own.

This sounds like an interesting exploration of feminism in the 70's and I think a book I would really enjoy.

Are any of these books on your TBR? If you've already read them, let me know what you thought! Leave a comment with your own #5OnMyTBR posts for me to check out! Happy Reading! 

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